Jacob and Esau

Dear Parents,

Jacob and Esau were rivals before birth. They struggled in the womb, and Jacob was born grabbing onto Esau’s heel. Even though he was younger, Jacob convinced Esau to sell him his birthright for some stew. When Isaac was old and blind, the time came for Isaac to bless Esau. With the blessing came the privilege afforded to the firstborn—leadership over the family. With Rebekah’s guidance, Jacob deceived his father and stole his brother’s blessing.

In his anger, Esau planned to kill Jacob. Rebekah sent Jacob away to her brother Laban until Esau calmed down. Isaac blessed Jacob before he left and told him to find a wife among his relatives.

Jacob had a 500-mile journey ahead of him. Along the way, he stopped and camped under the stars. He used a rock as a pillow and fell asleep. That night, Jacob dreamed and saw a stairway from the ground to the sky, and God’s angels were going up and down on it.

The Lord stood beside him and said, “I am the Lord, the God of your father Abraham and the God of Isaac” (Gen. 28:13). God promised to give Jacob’s family land and numerous descendants, and He promised they would be a blessing to all the nations of the earth. 

In the morning, Jacob set up the stone as a marker and poured oil on it He named the place Bethel, which means “House of God.” He vowed to follow God if God kept His promise to be with him and take care of him. Then Jacob continued on his journey.

As you share with your kids, remind them that Jacob was the child chosen by God to carry the family line—to follow God, to lead the family, and to teach the next generation to follow God too. The promises for Abraham and Isaac also became the promises for Jacob. At Bethel, God showed that His plan was to continue the covenant through Jacob’s family and eventually a whole nation, leading to the birth of Jesus—the promised Savior.

Check this session’s Activity Page and Big Picture Card as well as the Gospel Project for Kids Family App for ways to interact with the Bible content this week.

FAMILY STARTING POINTS 

Babies and Toddlers

  • God keeps His promises.

  • God promised to bless Jacob.

  • Jacob made a wrong choice to trick Isaac.

  • God sent Jesus through Jacob’s family.

Preschool

  • Does God keep His promises? God always keeps His promises.

  • Jacob tricked Isaac.  

Kids

  • Does God keep His promises? God always keeps His promises because He is faithful.

  • Rebekah and Jacob tricked Isaac into blessing Jacob.

UNIT KEY PASSAGE

Genesis 28:15 (Genesis 28:15a for Babies and Toddlers)


NEXT WEEK 

“Jacob and Rachel” (Genesis 29–31)

God's Promise to Isaac

Dear Parents,

In His covenant with Abraham, God promised land, descendants, and a blessing to all the nations of the earth. (Gen. 22:17-18) God would keep His promise through every generation, choosing one person to carry the line until one day, a child would be born into the family who would be the promised One. God reaffirmed the promise to Abraham’s son Isaac. Isaac was the next child chosen to carry the family line.

After 20 years of marriage, Isaac and Rebekah still did not have children. Isaac prayed that God would give Rebekah a child, and God answered his prayer. Rebekah became pregnant with twins, but the pregnancy was difficult. The twins fought inside her, and Rebekah asked God, “Why is this happening to me?”

God explained His plan for the twins. The boys’ families would become two nations (from Esau, the nation of Edom; from Jacob, the nation of Israel), one stronger than the other. And the older son would serve the younger. This was uncommon; the firstborn had a birthright—a double portion of the inheritance. But this prophecy showed God had chosen the younger twin to inherit the promise made to Abraham.

Jacob and Rebekah’s boys were born and the older, Esau (EE saw), was unlike the younger, Jacob. Esau became a hunter, and Jacob stayed at home. One day, Esau agreed to give his birthright to Jacob in exchange for some bread and a bowl of stew.

Isaac may have perceived the conflict between brothers as a threat to the covenant. But God appeared to Isaac at Gerar reaffirmed His promise of land, descendants, and a blessing to all the nations of the earth. (Gen. 26:4) He encouraged Isaac to be faithful like Abraham. God was at work in each generation. He showed grace by extending the promise to those who had no innate right to it, to those who did not deserve it.

As you share this story with your kids, remind them that God’s covenant with Abraham continued to the next generation. Esau sold his birthright, giving Jacob the right to the wonderful blessings God promised to his father Abraham. Through Jacob’s family, God would send the promised Savior to bring blessing and salvation to the world.

Check this session’s Activity Page and Big Picture Card as well as the Gospel Project for Kids Family App for ways to interact with the Bible content this week.

FAMILY STARTING POINTS 

Babies and Toddlers

    • God made a promise.

    • God kept His promise by giving Isaac and Rebekah sons.

    • God promised to send Jesus into Isaac’s family.

    • God always keeps His promises.

Preschool

    • Why can we trust God? We can trust God because He is faithful.

    • God reminded Isaac about His promises.

Kids

    • Why can we trust God? We can trust God because He is faithful and does everything for His glory and our good.

    • God’s covenant with Abraham continued with Isaac’s family.


UNIT KEY PASSAGE

Galatians 3:29 (Galatians 3:29b for Babies and Toddlers)


NEXT WEEK 

“Jacob and Esau” (Genesis 27–28)

Isaac and Rebekah

Dear Parents,

After God tested Abraham, Abraham named the place “The LORD Will Provide” (Gen. 22:14) God repeated His promise to Abraham: “I will indeed bless you and make your offspring as numerous as the stars of the sky … And all the nations of the earth will be blessed by your offspring” (Gen. 22:17-18).

God blessed Abraham’s life, and he was about 140 years old when he asked his most trusted servant to go to his relatives and find a wife for his 40-year-old son Isaac. Abraham believed God would keep His promise; he trusted that God had a wife for Isaac and that Isaac would have a family because he was the child chosen by God to carry the family line—to follow God, to lead the family, and to teach the next generation to follow God too.

Abraham’s servant asked God for a clear sign of who should be Isaac’s wife. When Rebekah appeared and agreed to give water to the servant—and also, she offered, to his camels—the servant knew God was at work. He responded with worship: “Blessed be the LORD, the God of my master Abraham, who has not withheld his kindness and faithfulness from my master” (Gen. 24:27).

Rebekah introduced the servant to her family, including her brother Laban. The servant recounted the events, and everyone agreed the Lord had chosen Rebekah to be Isaac’s wife. She traveled with the servant hundreds of miles to Abraham’s house. When she saw Isaac, she covered herself with a veil. The servant told Isaac everything that had happened. Then Isaac married Rebekah, and he loved her.

As you talk with your kids about this story, emphasize that God provided Rebekah as a wife for Isaac as part of His covenant to bless the whole world through Abraham’s family. One day, Jesus would be born into Abraham’s family as the promised Savior.

Check this session’s Activity Page and Big Picture Card as well as the Gospel Project for Kids Family App for ways to interact with the Bible content this week.


FAMILY STARTING POINTS 

Babies and Toddlers

    • God made a promise.

    • Abraham’s servant trusted God to help him.

    • God chose Rebekah to be Isaac’s wife.

    • God kept His promise to Abraham’s family.

Preschool

    • Why can we trust God? We can trust God because He is faithful.

    • God gave Isaac a wife.

Kids

    • Why can we trust God? We can trust God because He is faithful and does everything for His glory and our good.

    • God gave Isaac a wife to keep His covenant with Abraham.


UNIT KEY PASSAGE

Galatians 3:29 (Galatians 3:29b for Babies and Toddlers)


NEXT WEEK 

“God's Promise to Isaac” (Genesis 25–26)

Abraham and Isaac

Dear Parents,

This week, kids learn that God kept His promise to give Abraham and Sarah a son, and they named him Isaac. Isaac was the child chosen by God to carry the family line—to follow God, to lead the family, and to teach the next generation to follow God too. When Abraham was well over 100 years old, God tested Abraham. God instructed him to sacrifice Isaac on a mountain. How could this be? Abraham had waited so long for this child!

But Abraham obeyed. He got up early the next day and left on his trip. Instead of waiting around to see if God would change His mind, he saddled the donkey, took the wood, two servants, and his son, and left on the journey as God commanded.

As Isaac walked with his father, he noticed something was missing. They had the wood and the fire, but “Where is the lamb?” Isaac asked. Abraham answered that God Himself would provide. Abraham had supreme faith that God was able to do anything. Before going up the mountain, Abraham told the servants, “Stay here … we’ll come back” (Gen. 22:5). Hebrews 11:19 also gives us a peek inside Abraham’s mind: “He considered God to be able even to raise someone from the dead.”

God did provide. He provided a ram in place of Isaac, who was spared. After what we might imagine was quite a worship service, Abraham and Isaac returned home.

This week, help your kids understand that in the New Testament, God brings through John the Baptist the final answer to Isaac’s inquiry, “Where is the lamb?” “Here is the Lamb of God, who takes away the sin of the world!” (John 1:29).

Abraham showed his love for God by being willing to sacrifice his son Isaac. This is how God showed His love for us: He sent His Son, Jesus, to die on the cross so that we could have eternal life through Him. He was the sacrifice made in our place so we can live.

Check this session’s Activity Page and Big Picture Card as well as the Gospel Project for Kids Family App for ways to interact with the Bible content this week.

FAMILY STARTING POINTS 

Babies and Toddlers

    • God made a promise.

    • Abraham trusted God to keep His promise.

    • God gave a ram to use as the sacrifice.

    • God promised to send Jesus into Abraham’s family.

Preschool

    • Why can we trust God? We can trust God because He is faithful.

    • Abraham trusted God.

Kids

    • Why can we trust God? We can trust God because He is faithful and does everything for His glory and our good.

    • Abraham trusted God even when he did not understand God’s plan.


UNIT KEY PASSAGE

Galatians 3:29 (Galatians 3:29b for Babies and Toddlers)

NEXT WEEK 

“Isaac and Rebekah” (Genesis 24)

God's Covenant with Abraham

Dear Parents,

Over the next few weeks of the Gospel Project for Kids, kids will learn that God was still working out His plan to send Jesus into the world to rescue us from sin. Since the beginning, God wanted to bless and provide for His people. Genesis 11 records the generations between Noah and Abram. Noah’s son Shem had a family. Through Shem’s line, God would keep His promise to send a Savior. Shem’s seventh-great grandson was named Abram. Abram was born in Ur of the Chaldeans.

Abram was in his homeland when God spoke to him. God told Abram: “Go out from your land, your relatives, and your father’s house to the land that I will show you. I will make you into a great nation, I will bless you, I will make your name great, and you will be a blessing. I will bless those who bless you, I will curse anyone who treats you with contempt, and all the peoples on earth will be blessed through you” (Gen. 12:1-3).

By faith, Abram obeyed God. He traveled toward the land of Canaan with his wife, Sarai; his father, Terah; and his nephew, Lot. They settled in Haran, about 600 miles from their home. When Abram was 75 years old, he left Haran with his wife, his nephew, and all their possessions.

Genesis 15 records the Abrahamic covenant. The word of the Lord came to Abram in a vision. God made a covenant with Abram and promised to give him offspring as numerous as the stars in the sky and to give his family the land of Canaan. At 99 years old, Abram was still childless. How would God keep His promise if Abram didn’t have any children? But God was serious about the covenant; He always keeps His promises. God even changed Abram’s name to Abraham, which means “Father of a Multitude.”


As you talk to your kids this week, help them discover God promised to bless all the world through Abraham. God sent Jesus from His home in heaven to be born on earth into Abraham’s family. Through Jesus, all the nations of the earth are blessed because Jesus saves people from their sins.

Check this session’s Activity Page and Big Picture Card as well as the Gospel Project for Kids Family App for ways to interact with the Bible content this week.

FAMILY STARTING POINTS 

Babies and Toddlers

  • God made a promise.

  • God made a promise to Abraham.

  • God always keeps His promises.

  • God promised to send Jesus into Abraham’s family.

Preschool

  • Why can we trust God? We can trust God because He is faithful.

  • God promised to bless all the world through Abraham.

Kids

  • Why can we trust God? We can trust God because He is faithful and does everything for His glory and our good.

  • God made a covenant to bless all the world through Abraham.


UNIT KEY PASSAGE

Galatians 3:29 (Galatians 3:29b for Babies and Toddlers)


NEXT WEEK 

“Abraham and Isaac” (Genesis 22)

The Suffering of Job

Dear Parents,

Why would we hear the story of Job while studying stories from Genesis? Most biblical authorities believe, based on subject matter and language, that Job was a contemporary to the patriarchs. Job fits chronologically into this period in history.

Job was a wealthy man who loved God. At the beginning of the book, God allows Satan to test Job’s faithfulness. Job lost everything, and he asked God why these things were happening. God answered Job, and His response reveals that God alone is all-powerful, sovereign, and good.

“Have you ever in your life commanded the morning or assigned the dawn its place?” (Job 38:12). God has. He is all-powerful. “Does the eagle soar at your command?” (Job 39:27). It does at God’s. He is sovereign. “Who provides the raven’s food when its young cry out to God?” (Job 38:41). God provides. He is good.

Everyone suffers—those who follow God and those who don’t. While the Book of Job speaks volumes to the problem of human suffering, it is also an important picture of how a suffering person should relate to God. Job didn’t understand his suffering and he even doubted God, but Job’s suffering ultimately brought him closer to God. God is always in control, even when His people can’t see the reason behind the suffering God allows.

As you share with your kids this week, help them see that following Jesus is worth it. God is good, present, and in control. We can trust Him even when we don’t understand the pain we have to endure. At the cross, God used the ultimate pain to bring about the ultimate good: our future and final salvation from sin. 

Job learned that God is all-powerful, sovereign, and good. When we face suffering, we can hope in God. God sent Jesus, the only truly innocent One, to suffer and die so that everyone who trusts in Him can have forgiveness and eternal life.

Check this session’s Activity Page and Big Picture Card as well as the Gospel Project for Kids Family App for ways to interact with the Bible content this week.

FAMILY STARTING POINTS 

Babies and Toddlers

    • God made everything.

    • Sad things happened to Job, but he loved God.

    • God is in charge of everything He made.

    • God sent Jesus because He loves us.


Preschool

    • Who is God? God is our Creator and King.

    • Job learned that God is always good.


Kids

    • Who is God? God is our Creator and King.

    • Job learned that God is good, even in suffering.


UNIT KEY PASSAGE

Colossians 1:16b-17 (Colossians 1:16b for Babies, Toddlers, and Preschoolers)


NEXT WEEK 

“God’s Covenant with Abraham” (Genesis 12; 15; 17)

The Tower of Babel

Dear Parents,

Following the flood, God commanded Noah in Genesis 9:1 to “Be fruitful and multiply and fill the earth.” This command echoes the one given to Adam and Eve in Genesis 1:28. God intended the paradise of the garden to spread into the whole world, but sinful people had other desires.

Genesis 10 accounts for the nations that spread out in the land after the flood (Gen. 10:32). The people moved east and settled in a valley. This story continues the cycle of distrust and disobedience to God. In Genesis 11:2, Scripture indicates that instead of filling the earth as God commanded, the people devised a plan to settle in one place and build a city and a large tower into the sky.

Read Genesis 11:4. The people’s motive was clear: “Let us make a name for ourselves.” The people didn’t want to be scattered. They didn’t believe God would give them what was good if they obeyed Him. They sought to obtain for themselves what they believed was good.

The people tried to build a monument with its top in the sky, but they succeeded only in separating themselves from God and from each other. God confused their language and scattered them over the earth. They were unable to finish building the city, so the city was called Babel—which sounds like the Hebrew word for “confused”—because there the Lord confused the people’s language.

As you share with your kids this week, help them see God’s better plan: His plan not for people to reach up to Him, but His plan to reach down to people by sending His Son, Jesus, to live the perfect life we couldn’t live and die the death we don’t want to die. Through Jesus, God brings together people of every tongue, tribe, and nation; we are all one in Christ. That is the gospel. Pray that your children would have open hearts to receive it.

People chose to give glory to themselves instead of God. They ignored God’s plan, so God confused their language and scattered the people all over the earth. One day, Jesus will gather together all of God’s people—people from every tribe and people who speak all kinds of languages—and they will worship Him together. (Revelation 7:9-10.

Check this session’s Activity Page and Big Picture Card as well as the Gospel Project for Kids Family App for ways to interact with the Bible content this week.

FAMILY STARTING POINTS 

Babies and Toddlers

    • God made everything.

    • God mixed up people’s words.

    • People spread out all over the earth.

    • One day, Jesus will bring people together again.


Preschool

    • Who is God? God is our Creator and King.

    • People wanted to build a tower to make themselves famous. 


Kids

    • Who is God? God is our Creator and King.

    • People tried to build a tower to glorify themselves instead of God.


UNIT KEY PASSAGE

Colossians 1:16b-17 (Colossians 1:16b for Babies, Toddlers, and Preschoolers)


NEXT WEEK 

“The Suffering of Job” (Job)

Noah and the Ark

Dear Parents,

Adam and Eve left the garden to start a life out in the world. Despite the grief of their sins, imagine their joy as their family grew. With each birth, maybe Eve hoped this son would be the one to end the curse of sin, to crush the head of the snake. (Gen. 3:15) But Adam and Eve witnessed sin’s effects on their own children: Cain murdered Abel. Cain was not the Promised One, and neither was Abel.

Some time later, Eve gave birth to another son, Seth. Seth lived 912 years. He saw the earth’s population grow as God sustained generation after generation. Less than 20 years after his death, Seth’s sixth-great-grandson, Noah was born.

By this time—10 generations after Adam—people had stopped following God. Scripture describes a deplorable situation: “Human wickedness was widespread on the earth … every inclination of the human mind was nothing but evil all the time” (Gen. 6:5).

God decided to send a flood to cleanse the earth. He was right to punish this sin. The waters would cover the earth and destroy everything. God graciously chose to save one man and his family, so he warned Noah about the flood and told him to build an ark.

Noah believed God’s warning about the coming judgment. He obediently worked to build the ark. But the work took years, and Noah likely faced ridicule from his friends and neighbors. Was Noah crazy, building a boat where there was no water?

Finally, God’s judgment came. Floodwaters covered the earth. Every living thing was destroyed, but Noah and his family were safe inside the ark. God rescued Noah’s family—the family His own Son would be born into. God rescued Noah and his family from the flood. The story of Noah points ahead to a greater rescue. God’s Son, Jesus—the only perfectly righteous One—came to take the punishment for our sin. By trusting in Him, we are saved from the punishment our sin deserves. 

As you share this story with your kids, remind them that Jesus would warn of God’s coming judgment too, but instead of condemning the world, Jesus would give up His life to rescue sinners.

Check this session’s Activity Page and Big Picture Card as well as the Gospel Project for Kids Family App for ways to interact with the Bible content this week.

 

FAMILY STARTING POINTS 

Babies and Toddlers

  • God made everything.
  • God covered the earth with water.
  • God kept Noah’s family safe.
  • God sent Jesus because He loves us.
  •  

Preschool

  • Who is God? God is our Creator and King.
  • God rescued Noah and his family.

Kids

  • Who is God? God is our Creator and King.
  • God punished sin but chose to rescue Noah and his family.

UNIT KEY PASSAGE

    • Colossians 1:16b-17 (Colossians 1:16b for Babies, Toddlers, and Preschoolers)

NEXT WEEK 

    • “The Tower of Babel” (Genesis 11)